Concrete Contractors

Looking for a Petaluma Concrete Contractors company?

Biondi Paving & Engineering is a Fully Licensed and Insured, Family Owned Paving Company serving the Sacramento area.

Paving projects require an experienced, professional team that knows what they are doing. Don’t leave your driveway or parking lot in the hands of a new company who may have never done a project like it before. Call someone who has “been there, done that” and can approach your project with excellence.

With over 70 years of experience helping customers in our area, we’re confident we can handle any paving project you have in mind - all while providing great customer service at rock-solid pricing you can count on.

About Biondi

Based in Sacramento, our mission is to safely provide high quality general engineering services on time, delivering the best value to you. A family tradition of serving with instilled core values since 1948, we are motivated to share our knowledge gained over the decades. We aim to give you, our customer, an exceptional experience and outstanding results!Based in Sacramento, our mission is to safely provide high quality general engineering services on time, delivering the best value to you. A family tradition of serving with instilled core values since 1948, we are motivated to share our knowledge gained over the decades. We aim to give you, our customer, an exceptional experience and outstanding results!

Amedeo Biondi 1948-1954

About Biondi 1

Gene Biondi 1955-1985

About Biondi 2

Steve Biondi 1986-Present

About Biondi 3

Insurance:

Broker Of Record:
Interwest Insurance Services
PO Box 255188
Sacramento Ca 95865-5188
(916) 488-3100

Workers Compensation:
Artisans Insurance LTD
A Member-Owned Group Captive Program
Specific Excess Reinsurance coverage by Zurich North America
Mike McStocker, CPCU – mmcstocker@iwins.com

Commercial General Liability & Auto Insurance:
ASDA West
Asphalt Surface Development Association
Regional Purchasing Group
$2Million Commercial Liability Limits / $5Million Excess Liability Umbrella
Greg Scoville – gscoville@iwins.com

Bonding:
Great American Insurance Company
A.M. Best# 002213
Rating A
Financial Size Category: XIII ( 1.25B- 1.5B)
Renee Ramsey, Administrator – rramsey@iwins.com

Financial:

D-U-N-S # 041649369
Business Lending
Confirmation Letter

Bonding Reference Letter:

What Our Customers Say...

NaSyR

stars

"Got to say the work they do is so much better than I've seen other companies do and I have seen pictures from other companies compared to biondi."

Jorge Dominguez

stars

"Great friendly work place"

Chuck Horton

stars

"Biondi Paving & Engineering did our site work, they did an excellent job. On time, on budget and high quality!"

Erin Gallagher

stars

About Concrete Contractors

There are many things to consider when hiring concrete contractors, such as what their credentials are. A concrete contractor can be a beneficial asset to any construction project, but there are certain steps that should be taken to ensure you will hire someone who will do a good job for you. Most of the time, you can obtain information on a concrete contractor by asking questions at various businesses, such as home improvement stores, apartment complexes and flooring stores. You may also find concrete contractors by placing an ad in the newspaper or on the Internet.

The first thing you need to do when trying to find concrete contractors is to create a business plan for your project. A business plan is essentially a list of your goals and the methods you will use to reach them. A concrete contractor should be able to help you with your business plan by providing you with statistics showing how long their company has been around and details about their expertise.

It is important to talk to several different contractors before making a final decision on who you want to employ to do a concrete repair job on your building. One way to find concrete contractors is to post ads in neighborhoods. Ask if anyone has a business that they would recommend. Another way is to attend local contractors meetings to network with other commercial concrete contractors.

After determining which concrete contractors need to be employed, it is important to determine the level of experience they have. For instance, there are different levels of experience for doing concrete works, such as installing pavers, sanding, pouring concrete and more. You should consider which level of experience a contractor has before making a decision. There is always the option of hiring a contractor that has been doing concrete work for many years, but this might cost you more. However, experienced concrete contractors need to be properly tested to ensure that they can do a good repair job on your building.

Most commercial cement contractors also have a website where their customers and clients can go to learn more about them. They may have testimonials and references to look at as well. It is also a good idea to ask your potential contractor's questions before hiring them. If the answers provided are satisfactory, they will likely be able to provide you with a list of past jobs and even let you see pictures of what they have done in the past. You can also request free estimates from concrete contractors, which can greatly increase productivity as they can show you their level of ability and tell you how much they plan on charging you.

Commercial concrete contractors can significantly increase productivity by contracting with qualified and experienced workers. The best results can be achieved when workers are skilled and knowledgeable at what they do. This is why you need to thoroughly research each company you are considering before hiring them to complete your cement work. With a little bit of research and thorough interviews, you can get a much better idea about which concrete contractors are the best at what they do.

 

Concrete Contractors Petaluma CA

About Petaluma

The Coast Miwok resided throughout Marin and southern Sonoma County. The village of Péta Lúuma was east of the Petaluma River, with a number of other Coast Miwok villages nearby: Wotoki was immediately to the south of Péta Lúuma, on the opposite side of the river; Etem, Likatiut, and Tuchayalin were near today's downtown; and Tulme and Susuli were just north of today's city limits.

The Petaluma area was part of a 66,000-acre (270 km2) 1834 Mexican land grant by Governor Jose Figueroa to Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo called Rancho Petaluma. In 1836, Vallejo ordered construction of his Rancho Petaluma Adobe, a ranch house in Petaluma, which his family often used as a summer home, while he resided in the neighboring town of Sonoma. Vallejo's influence and Mexican control in the region began to decline after Vallejo's arrest during the Bear Flag Revolt in 1846.

Pioneers moved to Petaluma from the eastern United States after James Marshall found gold in the Sierra Nevada in 1848. The town's position on the Petaluma River in the heart of productive farmland was critical to its growth during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Sailing scows, such as the scow schooner Alma (1892), and steamers plied the river between Petaluma and San Francisco, carrying agricultural produce and raw materials to the burgeoning city of San Francisco during the California Gold Rush.

There were brothels downtown along Petaluma Boulevard, which used to be the main thoroughfare until U.S. Highway 101 was constructed in the 1950s. The Petaluma Historic Commercial District is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The Sonoma County Bank Building was the home of the Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Company and the Petaluma Seed Bank until 2019. It was built in 1926.

Petaluma soon became known for its grain milling and chicken processing industries, which continue to the present as a smaller fraction of its commerce. At one time, Petaluma was known as the "Egg Capital of the World," sparking such nicknames as "Chickaluma". Petaluma hosted the only known poultry drugstore and is the place where the egg incubator was invented by Lyman Byce in 1879.

One of the largest historic chicken processing plants still stands in the central area of town; this 1930s brick building is no longer used for the chicken industry, but is being evaluated for preservation and change of use. Even though it is no longer known as the Egg Capital of the World, Petaluma maintains a strong agricultural base today with dairy farms, olive groves, vineyards, and berry and vegetable farms.

According to the Army Museum at the Presidio, San Francisco, Petaluma was relatively unharmed during the San Francisco earthquake of April 18, 1906, due to significant stable bedrock underlying the region. As one of the few communities in the region left standing after the earthquake, Petaluma was the staging point for most Sonoma County rescue and relief efforts.[citation needed]

Petaluma is today the location of many distinguished, well-preserved pre-1906 buildings and Victorian homes on the western side of the river. The downtown area has suffered many river floods over the years[citation needed] and during the Depression commerce declined. A lack of funds prevented the demolition of the old homes and buildings.[citation needed] In the 1960s there was a counter-culture migration out of San Francisco into Marin County and southern Sonoma County, looking for inexpensive housing in a less urban environment. The old Victorian, Queen Anne and Eastlake style houses were restored. Historic iron-front buildings in the downtown commercial district were also rescued. Traffic and new home development for the most part was rerouted to the east of downtown by the construction of the 101 freeway.[citation needed] The downtown Petaluma Historic Commercial District is on the National Register of Historic Places.

The first official airmail flight took place in 1911, when Fred Wiseman carried a handful of mail from Petaluma to Santa Rosa, including letters from Petaluma postmaster John E. Olmstead and the mayor of Petaluma. Wiseman's plane ended up in the National Air and Space Museum.

There was a substantial influx of Jewish residents to the area in the first three decades of the 20th century. Most of the settlers were secular Eastern European Jews; they founded today's B'nai Israel Jewish Center as a secular Jewish community center with no rabbi and only a small area for prayer. The community became active in the poultry industry, and some settlers joined the local labor movement and participated in leftist political organizing, leading to significant conflicts between integrationists who aimed to quietly integrate into Petaluma society and socialists who hoped to change it.

With its large stock of historic buildings, Petaluma has been used as the filming location for numerous movies set in the 1940s, '50s, and '60s (see list of movies below). The historic McNear Building is a common film location.

Petaluma pioneered the time-controlled approach to development. After Highway 101 was re-aligned as a freeway in 1955, residential development permits tripled, from 300 in 1969 to 900 in 1971. Because of the region's soaring population in the sixties, the city enacted the "Petaluma Plan" in 1971. This plan limited the number of building permits to 500 annually for a five-year period beginning in 1972. At the same time Petaluma created a redbelt around the town as a boundary for urban expansion for a stated number of years. Similar to Ramapo, New York, a Residential Development Control System was created to distribute the building permits based on a point system conforming to the city's general plan to provide for low and moderate income housing and divide development somewhat equally between east and west and single family and multi-family housing.

The stated objectives of Petaluma's time controlled growth management were to ensure orderly growth; to protect the city's small town character and surrounding green space; to provide a variety of housing choices; and to maintain adequate water supply and sewage treatment facilities.

The controlled development plan attracted national attention in 1975 when the city was taken to court by the Construction Industry Association. The city's restriction was upheld by the 9th Circuit Court in 1975 and the Supreme Court denied a petition for writ of certiorari in 1976. This court ruling still forms the foundation for most local growth management ordinances in California.[citation needed]

Despite this history of planned development, the Petaluma City Council voted on April 13, 2009, to eliminate the entire planning department and lay off the whole planning staff. Planning Division responsibilities were subsequently contracted out to the consulting firm Metropolitan Planning Group, which re-hired some of the former planning staff and continues to operate planning services for the city.

In the late 1990s, Petaluma was also known as Telecom Valley due to the telecom startup companies that seemed to multiply from one another, and offer great riches for early stockholders and employees. Two success stories were that of Advanced Fibre Communications (AFC) (now Tellabs), and Cerent, which was purchased by Cisco. Some Cerent employees went on to purchase the Phoenix Theater, a local entertainment venue, which was once an opera house.

The City has identified about two dozen buildings and districts as Petaluma landmarks.

The 2010 United States Census reported that Petaluma had a population of 57,941. The population density was 3,998.9 people per square mile (2,590/km2). The racial makeup of Petaluma was 46,566 (80.4%) White, 801 (1.4%) African American, 353 (0.6%) Native American, 2,607 (4.5%) Asian (1.3% Chinese, 0.9% Filipino, 0.8% Asian Indian, 0.4% Japanese, 0.3% Vietnamese, 0.2% Korean, 0.1% Pakistani, 0.1% Laotian, 0.1% Thai), 129 (0.2%), Pacific Islander, 5,103 (8.8%) from other races, and 2,382 (4.1%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 12,453 persons (21.5%). The Latino ethnic groups are Mexicans (16.2%), Salvadorans (1.2%), Guatemalans (0.6%), Nicaraguans (0.3%), Peruvians (0.3%), and Puerto Ricans (0.3%).

The Census reported that 57,217 people (98.8% of the population) lived in households, 361 (0.6%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 363 (0.6%) were institutionalized.

There were 21,737 households, out of which 7,541 (34.7%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 11,392 (52.4%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 2,257 (10.4%) had a female householder with no husband present, 1,052 (4.8%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 1,319 (6.1%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 207 (1.0%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 5,372 households (24.7%) were made up of individuals, and 2,366 (10.9%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.63. There were 14,701 families (67.6% of all households); the average family size was 3.14.

The population was spread out, with 13,455 people (23.2%) under the age of 18, 4,589 people (7.9%) aged 18 to 24, 15,041 people (26.0%) aged 25 to 44, 17,273 people (29.8%) aged 45 to 64, and 7,583 people (13.1%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.3 years. For every 100 females, there were 96.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.8 males.

There were 22,736 housing units at an average density of 1,569.2 per square mile (605.9/km2), of which 14,159 (65.1%) were owner-occupied, and 7,578 (34.9%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 1.3%; the rental vacancy rate was 4.8%. 37,389 people (64.5% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 19,828 people (34.2%) lived in rental housing units.

As of the census of 2000, there were 54,548 people, 19,932 households, and 14,012 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,953 people per square mile (2,590/km2). There were 20,304 housing units at an average density of 1,471/sq mi (568/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 84.16% White, 1.16% African American, 0.54% Native American, 3.91% Asian, 0.17% Pacific Islander, 6.08% from other races, and 3.98% from two or more races. 14.64% of the population were Hispanic.

There were 19,932 households, out of which 36.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.3% were married couples living together, 10.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.7% were non-families. 22.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.70 and the average family size was 3.16. The age distribution is: 26.2% under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 31.5% from 25 to 44, 24.1% from 45 to 64, and 11.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.9 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $61,679, and the median income for a family was $71,158 (these figures had risen to $68,949 and $85,513 respectively as of a 2007 estimate). Males had a median income of $50,232 versus $36,413 for females. The per capita income for the city was $27,087. About 3.3% of families and 6.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.2% of those under age 18 and 7.1% of those age 65 or over.

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